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It famously took Thomas Edison thousands of attempts to settle on a practical design for the incandescent light bulb. If each crack at a solution had cost him hundreds of millions of dollars, however, he might not have been so keen on using a build ‘em and bust ‘em approach.
Perhaps it should come as no surprise that the acronym for the environmental nanotechnology center headquartered at Duke is pronounced “saint.” After all, the inspiration for the center struck while founder Mark Wiesner was on sabbatical in France—a  nation renowned for its cathedrals and pantheon of saints—and the center maintains strong French ties to this day—ties that many Duke students and faculty members are capitalizing on.
Biomedical engineers have grown living skeletal muscle that looks a lot like the real thing. It contracts powerfully and rapidly, integrates into mice quickly, and for the first time, demonstrates the ability to heal itself both inside the laboratory and inside an animal. The study conducted at Duke University tested the bioengineered muscle by literally watching it through a window on the back of living mouse. The novel technique allowed for real-time monitoring of the muscle’s integration and...
For the millions of people forced to rely on a plastic tube to eliminate their urine, developing an infection is nearly a 100 percent guarantee after just four weeks. But with the help of a little bubble-blowing, biomedical engineers hope to bring relief to urethras everywhere.
Aspiring Duke entrepreneurs met with more than 20 startup employers during the inaugural StartupConnect event Thursday at Gross Hall. The event, which was open to Duke students, faculty, staff, alumni and parents, as well as invited guests from UNC, provided students with an understanding of the characteristics employers seek, as well as a realistic view of the job market and possible career paths.
By combining a synthetic scaffolding material with gene delivery techniques, researchers at Duke University are getting closer to being able to generate replacement cartilage where it's needed in the body.
Every year waste treatment facilities in the United States process more than eight million tons of semi-solid sewage called biosolids—about half of which is recycled into fertilizer and spread on crop land. The practice helps solve storage issues and produces revenue to support the treatment plants, but what else is being spread in that sludge?
Inventor Nikola Tesla imagined the technology to transmit energy through thin air almost a century ago, but experimental attempts at the feat have so far resulted in cumbersome devices that only work over very small distances. But now, Duke University researchers have demonstrated the feasibility of wireless power transfer using low-frequency magnetic fields over distances much larger than the size of the transmitter and receiver.
Stephen Rosenzweig, a PhD candidate in Duke's Department of Biomedical Engineering, has been awarded the first competitive Thurstone Medical Imaging Fellowship in Biomedical Engineering.
A Ph.D. in engineering, followed by years of postdoctoral study, has traditionally opened the door to an academic career focused on research and teaching—but more and more Ph.D. engineers are headed in other directions.  In fact, today, around 70 percent of Duke University’s engineering Ph.D. graduates head straight into non-academic fields, whether traditional engineering firms, device companies, consulting or even banking.