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For the millions of people forced to rely on a plastic tube to eliminate their urine, developing an infection is nearly a 100 percent guarantee after just four weeks. But with the help of a little bubble-blowing, biomedical engineers hope to bring relief to urethras everywhere.
Aspiring Duke entrepreneurs met with more than 20 startup employers during the inaugural StartupConnect event Thursday at Gross Hall. The event, which was open to Duke students, faculty, staff, alumni and parents, as well as invited guests from UNC, provided students with an understanding of the characteristics employers seek, as well as a realistic view of the job market and possible career paths.
By combining a synthetic scaffolding material with gene delivery techniques, researchers at Duke University are getting closer to being able to generate replacement cartilage where it's needed in the body.
Every year waste treatment facilities in the United States process more than eight million tons of semi-solid sewage called biosolids—about half of which is recycled into fertilizer and spread on crop land. The practice helps solve storage issues and produces revenue to support the treatment plants, but what else is being spread in that sludge?
Inventor Nikola Tesla imagined the technology to transmit energy through thin air almost a century ago, but experimental attempts at the feat have so far resulted in cumbersome devices that only work over very small distances. But now, Duke University researchers have demonstrated the feasibility of wireless power transfer using low-frequency magnetic fields over distances much larger than the size of the transmitter and receiver.
Stephen Rosenzweig, a PhD candidate in Duke's Department of Biomedical Engineering, has been awarded the first competitive Thurstone Medical Imaging Fellowship in Biomedical Engineering.
A Ph.D. in engineering, followed by years of postdoctoral study, has traditionally opened the door to an academic career focused on research and teaching—but more and more Ph.D. engineers are headed in other directions.  In fact, today, around 70 percent of Duke University’s engineering Ph.D. graduates head straight into non-academic fields, whether traditional engineering firms, device companies, consulting or even banking.
Entrepreneurship success stories abound in Duke’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Look at Advanced Liquid Logic: founded in 2004 by ECE graduate students Vamsee Pamula and Michael Pollack, the company was acquired in July 2013 by Illumina, Inc., which develops life science tools and integrated systems for analyzing genes.
Cell therapies may stop or reverse the pain and disability of degenerative disc disease and the loss of material between vertebrae, according to Duke University scientists.
Jim Shappell was on an airplane last winter the first time he gave “big data” much serious thought. Like many people, Shappell, Parsons Corporation’s Group Executive for Strategy and Business Development, was becoming familiar with the concept of big data. But some in-flight reading really got him thinking about its implications for the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry—in which Parsons is a multinational leader.