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By Anu Kotha(Kotha is a freshman at Pratt)Within the next 10 years, more than 70 million people are going to join the ranks of seniors. As they age, they will face several medical problems. One such problem concerns joints. The articular cartilage that allows bones to smoothly move over each other wears down with time. Unlike most tissues in the body, articular cartilage cannot heal itself. Due to the loss of this cartilage, bones rub against each other and cause tremendous pain at the joints,...
The National Science Foundation has awarded the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Duke University $100,000 to pioneer a new undergraduate curriculum.The Departmental-Level Reform of Undergraduate Engineering Education Planning Grant, as it is officially called, is for one year, after which the department will apply for a follow-up implementation grant (a three-year, $1.5-million award).The project’s principal investigator is Leslie Collins, associate professor of ECE,...
More than 600 parents, students and faculty members gathered in our “backyard” between Teer Engineering Library and the Levine Science Research Center Saturday October 25 for the annual Parents Weekend BBQ. Freshly prepared hush puppies, fried chicken and pulled pork fed the hungry masses."The food was excellent, the weather cooperated and the conversation was great," said Pratt Dean Kristina Johnson.
The Duke Robotics Club placed third in a field of 12 in the 6th International Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Competition in August in San Diego. In taking third, the club scored a noteworthy victory over the team from MIT, which placed fourth.The Pratt club’s robot, Gamera, is a 30-inch wide autonomous assembly of electrical motors, computers and batteries named after a giant flying turtle that starred in a Japanese monster movie. The Pratt robot’s most turtle-like qualities are the...
Awakening as his plane landed in Tanzania, biomedical engineering student Sumit Shah looked out a dusty window and saw an acacia tree. It took a while before his sleepy mind conjured an explanation for the odd, flat-topped canopy of leaves on slanting, nut-brown tree limbs. He was finally in Africa.
All of my high expectations were met and even surpassed as I finally arrived at the world-renowned Avenue de Champs Elysees in Paris, France as a study-abroad student through Duke's International Honors Program.
The Pratt School of Engineering welcomed one of its most accomplishedclasses with the start of classes Aug. 26. Two hundred and eighty-six students joined over 720 sophomores, juniors and seniors this academic year.This year’s matriculating class also had the highest SAT scores in thePratt School’s 63 year history. The middle quartile SAT scores for theentering class range from 1400 to 1530, with 92 percent of the incomingstudents in the upper 10 percent of their high school class....
Heather Byrd: A voice for engineering students by Steven Wright "My friends say I don't act like an engineer at all, and I find that amusing," she says with a smile. "I think they forget that engineers are people, too. Generally, people have a picture of engineers as these nerds who sit in the lab and study all the time, or they think of us as these pale students with no social skill, but most of us aren't like that."
Duke University's student chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) on April 4-6 will host this year's regional Carolinas Conference and nine student engineering design competitions, including concrete canoe races.
To help a five-year-old with cerebral palsy cut paper as easily as herclassmates, two students at Duke’s Pratt School of Engineering designedan electric scissors attached to a common computer mouse and aspecialized paper stabilizer.Engineering senior Andrew Reish, of Vienna, Va., and graduate studentTravis McLeod, of Winston-Salem, NC., designed their electric papercutting assister as part of a class, BME 260 Devices for Disabled, thatgives engineering students the opportunity to design...