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The 6th Annual “Envisioning the Invisible” Mahato Memorial Photo Contest took place on the evening of Thursday, April 21. Taking first place this year was Stefan Roberts, a biomedical engineering doctoral student whose striking image of a wildflower’s stamen and pistil wowed the judges. All the intriguing entries will be displayed in the Fitzpatrick Center atrium over the coming year.
BioMetrix, a startup company co-founded by Duke undergraduate Ivonna Dumanyan, has won the inaugural ACC InVenture Prize.
This spring break, Duke engineering undergraduates working with Mike Bergin traveled nearly 4,000 miles to study air and water quality in Bolivia's high-altitude capital city of La Paz, where they partnered with local students for a once-in-a-lifetime fieldwork experience.
There is a robot learning to be a nurse in the School of Nursing. And that’s not even the most interesting robotics project on Duke’s campus! Duke’s newly formed Robotics Group showed off a wide range of projects underway March 28, during the first annual Duke Robotics Student Symposium. More than 25 speakers from four different universities and one industry-leading company took turns giving TED-style talks.
GSK and Save the Children have awarded $226,600 to a program that uses a Duke innovation to help prevent mothers from passing HIV to their newborn children in Ecuador. The project uses a product dubbed the “Pratt Pouch”—which looks similar to a fast-food ketchup packet—to deliver anti-HIV medications to infants more accurately and efficiently.
Matthew McCann, Pratt ’16, spent his summer translating thoughts into movements. A biomedical engineering and mathematics major, the Duke senior contributed to work in the field of prosthetics by creating a brain-machine interface that senses different brain waves of a subject and converts them into movements of a mechanical hand.
Collecting ticks for infectious disease research—currently a manual process involving close contact with the ticks—is risky business, putting researchers in danger of contracting some of the very diseases they’re studying. But last year, Duke global health and medicine professor Greg Gray had an idea: could a robot do the job?
EGR 190: Applied Engineering Design is a hands-on course at Duke that can take students just about anywhere, including tens of thousands of feet in the air. For this year’s capstone project, dubbed the Duke High Altitude Balloon Project, students in the class launched two weather balloons to capture atmospheric data as well as some pretty stellar photos and videos. The class introduces a new project each time it is taught, making this year’s high-altitude balloon design a novel challenge. And a...
During the 2015 Shell Eco-marathon, the Duke Electric Vehicles (DEV) team had quite a showing. Not only did they take 2nd place in their category, their carefully catalogued research into the optimal thickness of their car’s carbon-fiber body won them the Technical Innovation Award. The accomplishment helped Duke be considered as a front-runner for Shell’s Make the Future corporate campaign.
Bacteria that eat methane and turn themselves into cattle feed. A solar-powered pressure cooker that sterilizes medical equipment in rural clinics. A fleet of FedEx trucks powered by natural gas that would have been burned off through flare stacks and wasted.