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This fall, Duke welcomes its first Charles M. Vest NAE Grand Challenges for Engineering International Scholar to campus. Reminiscent of a reverse Rhodes Scholarship, the award gives international graduate students the opportunity to spend a year at one of nine universities in the United States conducting research addressing the U.S. National Academy of Engineering’s Grand Challenges for Engineering.
Two degrees plus two scan energies and one heavy metal equals a new way to detect dangerous plaques in the coronary arteries. Potentially. Jeffrey Ashton, a biomedical engineering graduate student in Duke University’s  MD-PhD program, has won an American Heart Association Fellowship to develop a new contrast agent for CT scans. Not only would the agent be able to detect plaque buildup in arteries, but also reveal how likely the plaque is to rupture and cause a heart attack or stroke.
The PhD Plus Program is designed to assist graduate students in making effective career decisions in industry, consulting, government or academia. Recently Dean Katsouleas and CEE PhD candidate Sarah Diringer wrote about the value of the program for Forbes. Read the original version at Forbes, or see the text below. PhDs Ready-Made For The Business World By Tom Katsouleas and Sarah Diringer
Most schools across the United States provide simple vision tests to their students—not to prescribe glasses, but to identify potential problems and recommend a trip to the optometrist. Researchers are now on the cusp of providing the same kind of service for autism.
Duke University awarded degrees to 428 undergraduate and graduate engineering students on Sunday, May 11, in ceremonies that began with university-wide commencement exercises at Wallace Wade Stadium and included Pratt School of Engineering celebrations at Cameron Indoor Stadium and Duke Chapel. Adding to students who graduated in September and Fall of 2013, this brings the total Class of 2014 up to 630.
Innovative research like that being carried out at Duke is essential to the future of energy security, sustainability and environmental safety, the deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of Energy told an audience at the Sanford School of Public Policy after a daylong visit with Duke students, faculty and research staff.
It famously took Thomas Edison thousands of attempts to settle on a practical design for the incandescent light bulb. If each crack at a solution had cost him hundreds of millions of dollars, however, he might not have been so keen on using a build ‘em and bust ‘em approach.
Perhaps it should come as no surprise that the acronym for the environmental nanotechnology center headquartered at Duke is pronounced “saint.” After all, the inspiration for the center struck while founder Mark Wiesner was on sabbatical in France—a  nation renowned for its cathedrals and pantheon of saints—and the center maintains strong French ties to this day—ties that many Duke students and faculty members are capitalizing on.
Biomedical engineers have grown living skeletal muscle that looks a lot like the real thing. It contracts powerfully and rapidly, integrates into mice quickly, and for the first time, demonstrates the ability to heal itself both inside the laboratory and inside an animal. The study conducted at Duke University tested the bioengineered muscle by literally watching it through a window on the back of living mouse. The novel technique allowed for real-time monitoring of the muscle’s integration and...
For the millions of people forced to rely on a plastic tube to eliminate their urine, developing an infection is nearly a 100 percent guarantee after just four weeks. But with the help of a little bubble-blowing, biomedical engineers hope to bring relief to urethras everywhere.