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The 6th Annual “Envisioning the Invisible” Mahato Memorial Photo Contest took place on the evening of Thursday, April 21. Taking first place this year was Stefan Roberts, a biomedical engineering doctoral student whose striking image of a wildflower’s stamen and pistil wowed the judges. All the intriguing entries will be displayed in the Fitzpatrick Center atrium over the coming year.
Researchers believe that genetically modified bacteria can help explain how a developing animal keeps all of its parts and organs in the same general proportions as every other member of its species.
Rosa Li, a PhD student in psychology and neuroscience, has been named the winner of the 2016 Merritt Science Journalism Award. The $500 award recognizes a Duke graduate or undergraduate student for the best piece of science journalism produced during the previous calendar year.
Researchers have shown that, outside of a few specific examples, antibiotics do not promote the spread of bacterial antibiotic resistance through genetic swapping, as previously assumed. While the overuse of antibiotics is undeniably at the heart of the growing global crisis, new research published online April 11 in Nature Microbiology suggests differential birth and death rates and not DNA donation are to blame. The results have implications for designing antibiotic protocols to avoid the...
Duke University’s Pratt School of Engineering, Innovation & Entrepreneurship Initiative and Law School are launching a summer program that takes graduate students to the world’s hub for technical innovation and enterprise. The new offering will immerse students in the world of technology businesses both large and startup while teaching them the skills needed to succeed in Silicon Valley.
Ugonna Ohiri, a doctoral student in the laboratory of Nan Jokerst and Chris Dwyer and president of the Engineering Graduate Student Council, has been named this year’s Abele Student of the Year for the Pratt School of Engineering. The award will be presented on stage at the Julian Abele Awards Ceremony on April 16th, 2016, at the Treyburn Country Club.
Duke engineers have developed a technique to make artificial arteries that naturally produce biochemical signals vital to their functions. The technique is also ten times faster than current methods for tissue engineering of blood vessels.
Alexander Lavin,  a student in Duke’s distance Master of Engineering Management Program, was just recognized as being among the top four percent of 15,000 applicants in the science category on the 2016 Forbes “30 Under 30“ list. Lavin is currently researching artificial intelligence and natural language processing at Numenta in California while working his way through the management program.
Researchers have created a computer program that will open a challenging field in synthetic biology to the entire world. In the past decade, billions of dollars have been spent on technology that can quickly and inexpensively read and write DNA to synthesize and manipulate polypeptides and proteins.
During the 2015 Shell Eco-marathon, the Duke Electric Vehicles (DEV) team had quite a showing. Not only did they take 2nd place in their category, their carefully catalogued research into the optimal thickness of their car’s carbon-fiber body won them the Technical Innovation Award. The accomplishment helped Duke be considered as a front-runner for Shell’s Make the Future corporate campaign.