Lower Extremity Exoskeletons: Motor Adaptation of Lower Extremity Joints to Exoskeletal Impedances

Feb 24

Monday, February 24, 2014

9:00 am - 10:00 am
Hudson Hall 207

Presenter

Kamran Shamaei - Yale University

This talk centers on biomechanical performance of the human knee in interaction with external impedances. I explain that the knee behaves similar to a torsional spring in the stance phase of the gait and remains relatively silent throughout the rests. The spring-type behavior of the knee in stance inspires the design of a quasi-passive knee exoskeleton that implements a spring in parallel with the knee joint in the stance phase of the gait and allows free motion throughout the rest. The exoskeleton was employed in a series of experiments involving human subjects to study the motor adaptation of the lower extremity joints to external stiffnesses. The experiments were intended to reveal the level of motor adaptation to external impedances. I explain that the kinetic and kinematic performance of the lower extremity joints remained invariant under the assistance of the exoskeleton. I discuss the monoarticular and biarticular implications of the results and show that the lower extremity joints exhibit considerable adaptation to exoskeletal impedances.

Contact

Hester, Glenda
660-5359