FIP Seminar Series - "Looking Into Skin and Artwork - Applications of Nonlinear Optical Microscopy in Biomedicine and Art Conservation" - Dr. Martin Fischer, Duke University

Feb 4

Wednesday, February 4, 2015

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Physics 128

Presenter

Dr. Martin Fischer

FIP Seminar Series - "Looking Into Skin and Artwork - Applications of Nonlinear Optical Microscopy in Biomedicine and Art Conservation" - Dr. Martin Fischer, Associate Research Professor, Dept. of Chemistry, Duke University Nonlinear optical microscopy can provide contrast in highly heterogeneous media and a wide range of applications has emerged, primarily in biology, medicine, and materials science. The localized nature of nonlinear interactions leads to high spatial resolution, optical sectioning, and large possible imaging depth in scattering media. However, nonlinear contrast (other than fluorescence, harmonic generation or CARS) is generally difficult to measure because it is overwhelmed by the large background of detected illumination light. This background can be suppressed by using tailored femtosecond pulses or pulse trains to encode nonlinear interactions in background-free regions of the frequency spectrum.

Contact

Burns, August
660-5598
august.burns@duke.edu

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