MEMS Seminar: Hardware and Software Technology for Computational Atomistic Simulation

Feb 1

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

1:30 pm - 2:30 pm
Fitzpatrick Center Schiciano Auditorium Side A

Presenter

Dr. Jeff Hammond

Computational atomistic simulation represents a significant fraction of high-performance computing, with applications ranging from molecular dynamics to quantum many-body methods. I will discuss software development for high-performance computing systems based upon my experience with the well-known computational chemistry code NWChem and highlight important new developments for tensor contractions, which are the foundation of most quantum many-body methods. An overview of the latest Xeon Phi processor (Knights Landing) will be covered, along with how NWChem is being optimized for it using the vendor-agnostic OpenMP programming model. Lunch will be served from 1:00 - 1:30 pm.

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Contact

Siler, Katherine
919-660-5312
katherine.siler@duke.edu