News

A dashboard view from a vehicle taking measurements of certain types of pollutants during rush hour in Atlanta

July 21, 2017

Rush Hour Pollution May Be More Dangerous Than You Think

In-car measurements of pollutants that cause oxidative stress found exposure levels for drivers to be twice as high as previously believed.

February 11, 2015

Research, New Policies Protect “The Lungs of India”

You can’t see into the lungs of the people of Agra, India, home of the Taj Mahal. But just a glance at what should be pristine white marble domes of the local landmark shows that air quality is a major concern. The iconic domes are tarnished and need frequent cleaning to keep them white. A study by [...]

February 09, 2015

Controlling Genes with Light

Duke University researchers have devised a method to activate genes in any specific location or pattern in a lab dish with the flip of a light switch by crossing a bacterium’s viral defense system with a flower’s response to sunlight. With the ability to use light to activate genes in specific [...]

February 06, 2015

Wiesner and Daubechies Named National Academy of Engineering Members

Mark Wiesner, the James L. Meriam Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Ingrid Daubechies, professor of electrical and computer engineering and the James B. Duke Professor of Mathematics, have been named members of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE)—one of the highest [...]

February 03, 2015

Creating Virtual Wind for Physical Turbines

It’s hard to figure out which way the wind blows. It’s full of random fluctuations, changes of direction, currents and eddies, and it can have a completely different profile a short distance away. And it doesn’t help that it’s invisible. But accurately creating computer models of the wind is [...]

January 30, 2015

Mikkelsen Wins AFOSR Young Investigator Award

Maiken Mikkelsen, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering and physics at Duke University, has earned an award through the Air Force Office of Scientific Research Young Investigator Research Program. The program supports scientists and engineers who have received their PhD in the [...]

January 29, 2015

A Chat with Dean Simmons

Connie Simmons is the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Affairs at the Pratt School of Engineering. She started working at Duke University in 1978 and has held various positions over the years. She was hired by Aleksandar S. Vesic (dean of engineering from 1974-1982) and has served under four [...]

January 28, 2015

Hoffman Wins National Science Foundation Early CAREER Award

Brenton Hoffman, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Duke University, has been awarded a National Science Foundation Early CAREER Award. The award supports outstanding young faculty members in their efforts to build a successful research enterprise and comes with a five-year, $500,000 [...]

January 27, 2015

Michael Bergin: Studying Tiny Particles with a Giant Global Impact

Michael Bergin joined the Pratt School of Engineering’s Civil and Environmental Engineering Department in January 2015. An expert on aerosols, Bergin studies the environmental and human health effects of natural and manmade microscopic particles floating all around the Earth’s atmosphere. Ranging [...]

January 23, 2015

More to Lightning Than Meets the Eye

There’s much more to a lightning bolt than meets the eye, and engineers at Duke University have invented an improved way of tracking these hidden phenomena. When a bolt of lightning flashes through the open air, less than 10 percent of the total electrical activity is visible. The rest is hidden [...]

January 21, 2015

Every Snowflake Is Not Unique

People like to say that every snowflake is unique. On the level of execution and fine detail, that may or may not be true. After all, who has seen every snowflake? It is certain, however, that every snowflake conforms to only one architecture: a flat star with six fishbones connected at the center [...]

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