News

The Superfund Research Center, housed in Environment Hall, received funding to pursue five new projects.

July 20, 2017

Studying Superfunds: Duke Environmental Engineers Investigate How Super-Polluted Areas Affect Early Human Health

As Duke's Superfund Research Center receives another round of funding, environmental engineers discuss how their work helps us learn more about common pollutants.

February 18, 2016

Rapidly Building Arteries that Produce Biochemical Signals

Duke engineers have developed a technique to make artificial arteries that naturally produce biochemical signals vital to their functions. The technique is also ten times faster than current methods for tissue engineering of blood vessels. Arterial walls have multiple layers of cells, including the [...]

February 17, 2016

Rolling Stones, Turbulence Connect Evolution to Physics

A law of physics explaining why larger animals live longer and travel further also extends to the simplest forms of mass migration on the planet—like rolling stones and turbulent eddies in water and air currents, according to research at Duke University. The finding demonstrates that evolution [...]

February 16, 2016

Henry Petroski: Insights on America's Road Taken

Henry Petroski published his 19th book, “The Road Taken,” on February 16, 2016. The book gives an in-depth look at the history and current state of infrastructure in the United States through the lens of roads and bridges. Through historical context, readers begin to understand how our roads came [...]

February 15, 2016

D-MEMP Student Alexander Lavin Makes Forbes "30 Under 30" List

Alexander Lavin, a student in Duke’s distance Master of Engineering Management Program, was just recognized as being among the top four percent of 15,000 applicants in the science category on the 2016 Forbes “30 Under 30“ list. Lavin is currently researching artificial intelligence and natural [...]

February 12, 2016

Meet Pratt's Dean Bellamkonda

Ravi Bellamkonda became new Vinik Dean of Duke’s Pratt School of Engineering on August 1, 2016. Previously chair of the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Bellamkonda was appointed in January after an international search, and cited by Duke’s President Richard Brodhead for his “outstanding personal accomplishment and visionary leadership.”

February 11, 2016

Building the World’s First Quantum Computer

In a building full of advanced photonics research, the laboratory of Jungsang Kim just might have the most complicated optical setups. After all, not many engineering challenges involve controlling the frequency of a laser to within a millionth of a percent. But building the world’s first quantum [...]

February 10, 2016

The Genetic Codes That Create Optical Computers

Researchers at Duke University can use photons instead of electrons to store data, drastically increasing the storage capacity of the optical analog of Blu-Ray discs. So what are your top 5,000 movies? “That’s the kind of ridiculous thing we can do, but I don’t know how we’re going to use it,” said [...]

February 08, 2016

West, Hawkins, Johnson Elected to the National Academy of Engineering

Jennifer West, the Fitzpatrick Family University Professor of Engineering at Duke University, has been elected to the National Academy of Engineering (NAE)—one of the highest professional distinctions for engineers. Also among the 80 new members announced by the NAE today are Kristina Johnson, [...]

February 04, 2016

How Gut Inflammation Sparks Colon Cancer

Chronic inflammation in the gut increases the risk of colon cancer by as much as 500 percent, and now Duke University researchers think they know why. Their new study points to a biomarker in the cellular machinery that could not only serve as an early warning of colon cancer, but potentially be [...]

February 02, 2016

Tick Collection? There's a Bot for That!

Collecting ticks for infectious disease research—currently a manual process involving close contact with the ticks—is risky business, putting researchers in danger of contracting some of the very diseases they’re studying. But last year, Duke global health and medicine professor Greg Gray had an [...]

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