News

A model system of a fungal spore and the water droplets that disperse them

July 26, 2017

Fungal Spores Harness Physics to Launch Themselves

Evolution has shaped fungal spores to aim and power their launch with merging water droplets

February 29, 2016

Engineered Swarmbots Rely on Peers for Survival

Duke University researchers have engineered microbes that can’t run away from home; those that do will quickly die without protective proteins produced by their peers. Dubbed “swarmbots” for their ability to survive in a crowd, the system could be used as a safeguard to stop genetically modified [...]

February 24, 2016

Mikkelsen Named 2016 Cottrell Scholar

Maiken H. Mikkelsen, the Nortel Networks Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and assistant professor of physics at Duke University, has been named a 2016 Cottrell Scholar in physics. The Cottrell Scholar program develops outstanding teacher-scholars who are recognized by [...]

February 23, 2016

Pratt Pouch Project Funded in Ecuador

GSK and Save the Children have awarded $226,600 to a program that uses a Duke innovation to help prevent mothers from passing HIV to their newborn children in Ecuador. The project uses a product dubbed the “Pratt Pouch”—which looks similar to a fast-food ketchup packet—to deliver anti-HIV [...]

February 19, 2016

An Adventure Abroad in Brain-Machine Interfaces

Matthew McCann, Pratt ’16, spent his summer translating thoughts into movements. A biomedical engineering and mathematics major, the Duke senior contributed to work in the field of prosthetics by creating a brain-machine interface that senses different brain waves of a subject and converts them [...]

February 18, 2016

Rapidly Building Arteries that Produce Biochemical Signals

Duke engineers have developed a technique to make artificial arteries that naturally produce biochemical signals vital to their functions. The technique is also ten times faster than current methods for tissue engineering of blood vessels. Arterial walls have multiple layers of cells, including the [...]

February 17, 2016

Rolling Stones, Turbulence Connect Evolution to Physics

A law of physics explaining why larger animals live longer and travel further also extends to the simplest forms of mass migration on the planet—like rolling stones and turbulent eddies in water and air currents, according to research at Duke University. The finding demonstrates that evolution [...]

February 16, 2016

Henry Petroski: Insights on America's Road Taken

Henry Petroski published his 19th book, “The Road Taken,” on February 16, 2016. The book gives an in-depth look at the history and current state of infrastructure in the United States through the lens of roads and bridges. Through historical context, readers begin to understand how our roads came [...]

February 15, 2016

D-MEMP Student Alexander Lavin Makes Forbes "30 Under 30" List

Alexander Lavin, a student in Duke’s distance Master of Engineering Management Program, was just recognized as being among the top four percent of 15,000 applicants in the science category on the 2016 Forbes “30 Under 30“ list. Lavin is currently researching artificial intelligence and natural [...]

February 12, 2016

Meet Pratt's Dean Bellamkonda

Ravi Bellamkonda became new Vinik Dean of Duke’s Pratt School of Engineering on August 1, 2016. Previously chair of the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Bellamkonda was appointed in January after an international search, and cited by Duke’s President Richard Brodhead for his “outstanding personal accomplishment and visionary leadership.”

February 11, 2016

Building the World’s First Quantum Computer

In a building full of advanced photonics research, the laboratory of Jungsang Kim just might have the most complicated optical setups. After all, not many engineering challenges involve controlling the frequency of a laser to within a millionth of a percent. But building the world’s first quantum [...]

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